How to Teach Reading (and When)

Teaching Reading: A Few Thoughts

There is a new game that’s being played at my house – the rhyming game. The children, it seems, are currently obsessed with finding words that rhyme with each other.

And it’s not connected with reading exercises or anything. The kids do it as fun.

I don’t know when this trend started but it’s recent. I have to laugh at that because I distinctly remember rhyming as something that was always a struggle for both my older children. And here they are now. Not only explaining it to my (as yet) illiterate four year old but making a raucous game of it all!

How My Children Learned to Read

When my oldest daughter was five, we started slow. We used Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons. As I said, we started very slowly. If we had problems blending sounds, we put the book away for a week or two and then came back. I did not push.

It was the same with my son. We did not do the writing part of the exercises. If you’ve seen Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessonsyou know what I’m talking about. (Highly recommended, by the way. It’s simple, straightforward and short. But feel free to customize it.)

But the rhyming! Oh, the rhyming!

It was a struggle, to put it mildly. And they didn’t get it. So we decided to skip that as well. I checked a few lessons down the road and was happy to discover the book dropped the rhyming exercises, so I didn’t worry about it.

Teaching Reading Need Not Be Scary

Reading is one of the first things most homeschooling parents teach and I think this is where we either develop our deep confidence or think maybe we’re not cut out to homeschool after all. In other words, teaching reading can make or break your homeschool.

Reading is also something children can and have picked up themselves.

So which is it? Is reading difficult or not?

Yes and no. If you start before the child is ready, it will be torture. A very wise homeschooling mom once told me to wait until they were ready. I am so glad I decided to take her advice.

She also told me not to rush after letter recognition, to start teaching reading only after the child was able to blend letters.


Are they ready? Here’s the exercise to be able to tell

The best advice I received was to wait until my child was ready. But what’s readiness? This is. Do this exercise.

After and only after the child is proficient at sounding out letters, offer a two letter word like “at” and see if the child can sound out the “a” and the “t” and blend them. If and only if he is able to do that, introduce a letter before the “at” to make words like cat, rat, etc.

If the child successfully blends these, congratulations, your child is reading and you can now proceed – gently – with other lessons.

What to do while waiting

The hard part, of course, is waiting. There is a push for children to learn to read earlier and it’s easy to get caught up in that. But try to ignore that. While waiting, reading to them will be the most important thing.

If you have the need to introduce something reading-wise, I highly recommend The Letter Factory by Leapfrog. My kids watched this all the time and learned letter sounds very easily with it.


Good luck! And happy teaching!

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Author: Purva Brown

Writer / blogger at http://TheClassicalUnschooler.com - unapologetically blending two seeming opposites.

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