The Ultimate Reading List for Homeschoolers

The Ultimate Reading List for Homeschoolers

For a while now, I’ve been thinking about putting together a summer reading list of sorts for parents who are thinking about homeschooling.

If you’ve read my earlier posts, you probably know that I am a big advocate of new homeschoolers not jumping right into curriculum and taking some time to develop their convictions about why they plan to homeschool and how exactly they plan on going about the process. This isn’t always possible, yes. But if you’ve somehow stumbled across this page, read on for the affiliate links to a fairly large list of must-reads for new and experienced homeschoolers. Some of these books are my favorites, others not so much but I think if you just pick up a handful of them you will be much better prepared for your journey.

They follow no particular order and are not categorized. My advice? Read as many of them as you can. If you already have a well developed reason for homeschooling, you are less likely to get overwhelmed and give up when the going gets hard – as it usually does in something worth pursuing.

So without further ado, here’s the master list:

The Well Trained Mind by Susan Bauer – considered by many in the classical community to be indispensable in a classical education. This is a great handy reference for how to structure a homeschooling day and what to teach, broken down by subjects. Can be a tad overwhelming for new homeschoolers, but worth the read.

Why Johnny Can’t Read by Rudolph Flesch – an excellent, spirited book on how to teach reading and why the look-say method is a bad idea.

Homeschooling For Excellence by David and Micki Colfax – one of the first books I read about homeschooling. The two were teachers when they decided to homeschool and… well, let’s just say, it’s very inspiring.

Teach Your Own by John Holt – must read author. He has also written How Children Learn, How Children Fail and Learning All The TimeHolt coined the term “unschooling,” but even if you don’t see yourself as an unschooler, don’t be scared off by the title. When he coined it, he meant simply “homeschooling.”


Deschooling Society by Ivan Illich – great, small book to get your mind wrapped around the fact that education doesn’t need to happen in an institution and the institution of school has led to society itself not being able to think outside of it.

The First Year of Homeschooling Your Child by Linda Dobson – I can’t remember if it was this one or one of her other books, but she had a great list of people who were homeschooling in non-traditional ways (for whatever reason) and were doing well. Her other books are Homeschoolers’ Success Stories, Homeschooling The Early Years, The Homeschooling Book of Answers.


For The Children’s Sake by Susan Schaeffer Macaulay – a great book to add to every homeschooler’s library. It was everything I always knew to be true about education but put together succinctly.

Home Education by Charlotte Mason – a good introduction to the Charlotte Mason form of home education, especially for the younger years.

A Charlotte Mason Companion by Karen Andreola – If you’re interested in the Charlotte Mason approach, this is about as complete a book in introducing it as you will find.


The Lost Tools of Learning by Dorothy Sayers – a short essay packed with the ultimate questions (and answers) of education and how to go about it. A must read, especially for those inclined to the Classical school of home education.

The Underground History of American Education by John Taylor Gatto – I can’t say enough about this book. If you’ve ever wondered why the American system of education got to be the way it is, you should take the time to read this book. You will never see school the same way again. Gatto, by the way, is another prolific writer and your homeschool library should include a smattering of his books, the best of which are Dumbing Us Down, Weapons of Mass Instructionand A Different Kind of Teacher


Better Late Than Early by Raymond and Dorothy Moore – If you think that you need preschool or early childhood education, this is the book you should read. Challenging the myth that early is better, there is a wealth of research cited which indicates that it is better to wait when it comes to school. The Moores have also written Home Grown Kids, Home Spun SchoolsThe Successful Homeschool Family Handbook and others. I would not start homeschooling without reading at least one of their books.


Teaching the Trivium: Christian Homeschooling in a Classical Style by the Bluedorns – Excellent book. I recently happened to come across it at a homeschool conference and intend to pick up a copy soon.

The Readaloud Handbook by Jim Trelease which is always mentioned when reading aloud is spoken about.

The Messianic Character of American Education, The Philosophy of the Christian Curriculum by RJ Rushdoony – If you’re a Christian who is thinking of homeschooling, you must read Rushdoony. It will help clarify and deepen your understanding of homeschooling and the philosophy behind it.


The Case for Classical Christian Education by Douglas Wilson – comes highly recommended by a lot of classical homeschoolers, including some of my blog readers.

The Christian Homeschool by Gregg Harris. Amazon just reminded me that I bought this book when I had a 2 year old and a 3 year old and we were pretty sure we were going to homeschool. I especially enjoyed the part about delight-directed learning.

The Core by Leigh Bortinis is a good, brief introduction to the classical method if you get bogged down by The Well Trained Mind. 

So You’re Thinking About Homeschooling by Lisa Whelchel – This was the first book I read that made me think, “Okay, I can do this. If she can, I can.” The book gives you snapshots of the lives of homeschooling families that are doing in their way. It emphasizes that there is no ONE way to do it and you are free to blaze your own trail. Very encouraging.


Feel Bad Education by Alfie Kohn – Clearly, he’s not for everyone and I don’t agree with a lot he says. However, I do read Kohn and take his work seriously. This is a book worth reading about the present state of education in our country.


A Thomas Jefferson Education by Oliver deMill. This one has recently been brought to my attention by my readers and I have yet to read it, but I wanted to add it because it looks intriguing.

When You Rise Up by R. C. Sproul Jr. – One of my absolute favorite books on Christian homeschooling. I loved it so much, I gave it away. I must buy another copy soon and I’m going to have a hard time not foisting it on someone who should read it. Heartily recommended.

The Montessori Method by Maria Montessori. So, here’s the thing about the Montessori method. I incorporate some of her ideas and I appreciate what she did but when I read the book and found out that much of her ideas were based on Rousseau’s philosophy, she lost validity with me. Still, there are people who really love this method and it’s worth exploring and learning about it.


Boys and Girls Learn Differently by Michael Gurian – I appreciate Michael Gurian’s work and sincerely believe that before homeschooling it is a good idea to take into consideration the personality and the sex of the child. My son and daughter are so different in how they learn and Gurian deals with just this issue so you don’t end up with false ideas and hopes about your children.


And, lastly, you have read my book, right? In case you haven’t, here’s your reminder: The Classical Unschooler by Purva Brown.

Happy reading! (If I’ve missed any, be sure to comment! If there are enough, I’ll add another post.)

 

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Author: Purva Brown

Writer / blogger at http://TheClassicalUnschooler.com - unapologetically blending two seeming opposites.

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